Showing posts with label Sixties. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sixties. Show all posts

Friday, 10 November 2017

Light my fire - The Doors

It's hard to believe that the debut single of the Doors was released 50 years ago. The band has been around for such a short time - not counting their post-Jim Morrison output - but have impressed every generation since.

This single was made this year to celebrate the band's 50th anniversary, using the Japanese single's original artwork. It is a curious release because Japanese singles didn't come in cardboard sleeves, but this remade single does. Nevertheless, this is a nice little item and I'm pretty satisfied to have picked this up during a visit to London, saving a little on the online price and a lot on postage (although obviously you could argue that a return flight to London is much more expensive. But anyway.)

My collection: 7" single no. 5874
Found: Fopp, London, October 27, 2017
Cost: 8 pounds
Tracks: 'Light my fire' / 'The crystal ship'

Tuesday, 1 August 2017

No! Dance with me - Marty Wilde

Released in 1963, 'No! Dance with me' was one of the first singles released by Marty Wilde not to chart after his run of hit singles between 1958 and 1962. The song was written by Marty himself, as might well be the B-side, which is incorrectly credited to Gerald Goffin and Carole King. They did indeed write a song with a similar title, but it does not resemble this song here.

This single was one of five Marty Wilde singles I ordered back in May, but for your pleasure I've spread the posting of them a little bit. After all, this is not a Marty Wilde tribute website - although I am quickly completing my collection now. There's still a handful of - rather expensive - singles missing, but I'll get there eventually.

My collection: 7" single no. 5822
Found: Recordsale.de, received May 11, 2017
Cost: 2 euro
Tracks: 'No! Dance with me' / 'Little miss Happiness'

Thursday, 20 July 2017

Mean woman blues - Marty Wilde

'Les rois du rock' declares the sleeve of this single, which means that it is some kind of reissue series, released in France. And indeed it is: 14 singles exist in this series, featuring artists like Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, Bill Haley and indeed, on vol. 10, Marty Wilde.

'Mean woman blues' and 'So glad you're mine' were never released as a single originally. Both tracks were taken from Marty's 1959 album 'Wilde about Marty'. The release date of the series 'Les rois du rock' is unknown because there is no year stated on the label. One source suggests that volume 1 was released in 1969, so this is most likely a late 1960's release.

My collection: 7" single no. 5855
Found: Ebay.co.uk, received July 19, 2017
Cost: 3 euro
Tracks: 'Mean woman blues' / 'So glad you're mine'


Dis rien - François Deguelt

I bought François Deguelt's first Eurovision title, Ce soir-là, three years ago, and here's the second one. In 1962 he returned to the Eurovision Song Contest, representing Monaco for the second time with the song 'Dis rien'. While he finished in third place in 1960, this performance improved on that, because he finished second with this song.This EP presents four songs by Deguelt.

He continued to perform on the nostalgia circuit in French speaking countries, until his death at the age of 81 on January 22, 2014.

My collection: 7" single no. 5840
Found: Discogs.com, received May 2017
Cost: 2 euro
Tracks: 'Dis rien', 'Don Juan' / 'Capuccina', 'L'animal blessé'

Monday, 17 July 2017

When day is done - Marty Wilde

I guess I'm not giving away a big secret when I say that Marty Wilde is a big fan of Elvis Presley. Out of all of his recordings, I find it's most evident in this recording: 'When day is done', released as a single in 1964.

The song was originally written in 1924 by Austrian composer Robert Katscher as 'Madonna, du bist schöner als der Sonnenschein'. It was translated into English by Buddy DeSylva and released as 'When day is done' in 1926. The earliest recordings were made by Art Kahn, Harry Archer and his Orchestra and Nat Shilkret. Later the song was covered by artists such as George Benson, Bing Crosby, Al Jolson and indeed Marty Wilde. His version didn't become a hit, although listening to this I can't imagine why not. Simply beautiful!

My collection: 7" single no. 5844
Found: Discogs.com, received June 25, 2017
Cost: 3 pounds
Tracks: 'When day is done' / 'I can't help the way that I feel'

Jesamine - Jason Chase

Some singles are mysterious. This single by Jason Chase is a good example. Released in 1968 on the Atco label in the USA, it features two cover versions: the A-side is a version of Marty Wilde and Jack Gellar's 'Jesamine' (made famous by the Casuals), and the B-side is a version of Leonard Cohen's 'Suzanne'.

But who is Jason Chase? Other than the fact that he sings both these tracks and has also produced them, there is no information anywhere about this man. I'd be interested to find out more, but for now, he remains a total mystery.

My collection: 7" single no. 5849
Found: Discogs.com, received July 12, 2017
Cost: $3
Tracks: 'Jesamine' / 'Suzanne'

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Où sont-elles passées - Romuald

'Où sont-elles passées' ('Where have they gone') was the Monegasque entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 1964, performed in French by French singer Romuald. The song was composed by noted French orchestra leader Francis Lai, best known for his film scores. Romuald laments the departure of the girls of his youth, explaining that as he grows older he loses the enjoyment and mystery of his early romances. It was a successful song for Monaco that year, ending up in third place.

Romuald ended up participating in the Eurovision Song Contest two more times: in 1969 for Luxembourg with 'Catherine' and in 1974 for Monaco once more with 'Celui qui reste et celui qui s'en va'. 

My collection: 7" single no. 5840
Found: Discogs.com, received May 18, 2016
Cost: 3 euro
Tracks: 'Ou sont-elles passées', 'Demain' / 'A jamais', 'Toi ma blonde'

Listen to the song

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

I've got so used to loving you - Marty Wilde

My listing of old Marty Wilde singles continues, because I've bought quite a few of them recently. 'I've got so used to loving you' was one of them, another unsuccessful single for Marty from the mid-Sixties. Released in 1966, it failed to chart despite its beautiful melody. The song was written by Jerry Brooks and Al Stillman. The B-side was written by Marty Wilde himself with Ronnie Scott.

'I've got so used to loving you' was also recorded by Leola Jiles, former member of the Apollas, in America in January 1967.

My collection: 7" single no. 5825
Found: Recordsale.de, received May 11, 2017
Cost: 2 euro
Tracks: 'I've got so used to loving you' / 'The beginning of the end'

Listen to the song

Tuesday, 16 May 2017

The Mexican boy - Marty Wilde

'The Mexican boy' does not appear on all the compilation albums of Marty Wilde that appeared recently. It was originally released on September 11, 1964. Both the A-side and the B-side were written by Marty Wilde himself, using the pseudonym Frere Manston.

The song also appeared on Marty's 1969 album 'Diversions' as 'Juan the Mexican boy'. That album is definitely in need of being released on CD. The B-side 'Your kind of love' could serve as an excellent bonus track.

My collection: 7" single no. 5821
Found: Recordsale.de, received May 11, 2017
Cost: 3 euro
Tracks: 'The Mexican boy' / 'Your kind of love'

Listen to the song

Monday, 15 May 2017

Lonely avenue - Marty Wilde

The song Lonely Avenue was featured on this blog eight years ago, because it appeared on an EP together with three other songs. Two of them appear on this original 7" single, released some time before that EP. Bought together with a few other Marty Wilde releases, I decided I wanted to have this original release too.

It's interesting for fans of John Barry that he appears on these two tracks with his orchestra as well.

My collection: 7" single no. 5824
Found: Recordsale.de, received May 11, 2017
Cost: 2 euro
Tracks: 'Lonely avenue' / 'Brand new love'

Listen to the song

Friday, 12 May 2017

Hide and seek - Marty Wilde

You are bound to see a few Marty Wilde singles on this blog in the foreseeable future, because I am working on getting them all. That's not always easy, but this week I managed to mail order five of 'em together.

'Hide and seek' is the oldest of the lot, released in July 1961. After 'Rubber ball' was a top 10 hit, peaking at number 9 in the UK singles chart, this single was a relative disappointment, stalling at number 47. The B-side, 'Crazy dream' was written by Marty himself, while the A-side was a cover of a song written by Lionel Bart.

My collection: 7" single no. 5823
Found: Recordsale.de, received May 11, 2017
Cost: 2 euro
Tracks: 'Hide and seek' / 'Crazy dream'

Listen to the song

Thursday, 11 May 2017

The Mexican boy - Marty Wilde

Marty Wilde is best known for his run of hit singles between 1958 and 1962, but his output from later years is less well known. Most compilation albums focus on those five years, whereas he naturally evolved as a singer and songwriter. This single from 1964 is a great example.

The music of 'The Mexican boy' evokes images of Latin America whereas the story told by the lyric of the song is like a small theatre piece. Marty almost sounds like a crooner despite his relatively young age (he was 25 years old at the time). The single didn't become a hit, but obviously it should have been.

My collection: 7" single no. 5821
Found: Recordsale.de, received May 11, 2017
Cost: 3 euro
Tracks: 'The Mexican boy' / 'Your kind of love'

Listen to the song

Saturday, 6 May 2017

By the time I get to Phoenix - Marty Wilde

Jimmy Webb wrote 'By the time I get to Phoenix'. It was originally recorded in 1965 by Johnny Rivers. Two years later, it was covered by country singer Glen Campbell, who had a hit with it Stateside.

Marty Wilde recorded his version in 1968. The song was not a hit for him, but it should have been. Around the same time, he recorded his classic album 'Diversions'. Some success was looming in Europe with 'Abergavenny', a single taken from that album. Both were criminally ignored in the UK, but since Marty received an MBE yesterday, I guess all is forgiven now.

My collection: 7" single no. 5820
Found: Discogs.com, received May 6, 2017
Cost: 3 euro
Tracks: 'By the time I get to Phoenix' / 'Shutters and boards'

Listen to the song

Thursday, 27 April 2017

Festival San Remo 65 - Bobby Solo

Bobby Solo was born as Roberto Satti in Rome on March 18, 1945. At 19 he participated in the San Remo music festival, but he was disqualified for using playback, which was contrary to the festival's regulations.

The next year, 1965, he participated again... and won with the song 'Se piangi, se ridi'. As was tradition, the song went on to represent Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest that year. Bobby ended up in fifth place. This EP features four songs, but of course 'Se piangi, se ridi' is the first track on it.

My collection: 7" single no. 5806
Found: Record fair, Utrecht, April 8, 2017
Cost: 1 euro
Tracks: 'Se piangi, se ridi', 'Saro' un illuso' / 'Cristina', 'Meglio non parlar'

Listen to the song

Friday, 17 March 2017

Ring dinge ding - Thérèse Steinmetz

In 1967, Thérèse Steinmetz represented the Netherlands during the Eurovision Song Contest with the song 'Ring dinge ding' written by Johnny Holshuyzen and Gerrit den Braber. Performed first on the night, it ended up at place 14 in a field of 17 competitors, with just 2 points.

Steinmetz was born on May 17, 1933 in Amsterdam. She played various theatre, television and film roles and in 1966 she was given her own TV series, Thérèse. After participating in the Eurovision Song Contest she won the Golden Stag Festival in Romania, making her very popular in that country. These days she lives in Cannes (France), where she has become a successful painter.

My copy of this single turns out to be rather damaged, but it is a promotional copy which makes it a bit more special. 

My collection: 7" single no. 5892
Found: Discogs.com, received March 8, 2017
Cost: 5 euro
Tracks: 'Ring dinge ding' / 'Zing'

Listen to the song

Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Jezebel - Marty Wilde

The last time I saw Marty Wilde live - which, I'm ashamed to say, is almost ten years ago now! - it was his song 'Jezebel' that made the biggest impression on me. It sounded every bit as vibrant as it did on this original recording from 1962. The man and his voice were every bit as powerful as they were when he was just in his twenties.

At the time of the release of this single, Marty had already become a songwriter in his own right, but this song 'Jezebel' was written by Wayne Shanklin and originally recorded by Frankie Laine. Wilde added his own composition on the B-side. This single became his last top 20 hit in the UK, peaking at number 19.

My collection: 7" single no. 5855
Found: Discogs.com, received June 24, 2016
Cost: 1 pound
Tracks: 'Jezebel' / 'Don't run away'

Listen to the song

Sunday, 31 July 2016

Eurovision songs - Groot Draaiorgel Mortier

This is probably the most mysterious single I've ever bought. It didn't come with a sleeve, so all I have is the disc and the info on the label. It is credited to Groot Draaiorgel Mortier, and since the single is made in Belgium I have to assume it's a Belgian barrel organ.

The songs played by this barrel organ all come from the 1960 edition of the Eurovision Song Contest: 'Niet voor mij', 'Wat een geluk', 'Looking high' and 'Tom Pillibi'. There is no information about Groot Draaiorgel Mortier on the web, so this single looks likely to remain a mystery.

Listen to one side
Listen to the other side

My collection: 7" single no. 5819
Found: Kringloop Den Haag, January 16, 2016
Cost: 0,25 euro
Tracks: 'Niet voor mij', 'Wat een geluk' / 'Looking high', 'Tom Pillibi'

Sunday, 3 July 2016

The world would never turn again - Keith Potger

Keith Potger was a member of the Seekers, as the sleeve of his first solo single proclaims. The band had some success during the Sixties, until they disbanded in 1968.

'The world would never turn again' was released the next year, and although Potger would become a songwriter and producer, this first single was written by someone else. The B-side, interestingly, was provided by Frere Manston, which of course is a pseudonym of Marty Wilde. And there it is... the main reason for me to pick up this single. 

My collection: 7" single no. 5854
Found: Marktplaats, received June 22, 2016
Cost: 2 euro
Tracks: 'The world would never turn again' / 'Santa Maria'

Saturday, 26 December 2015

Think sometimes about me - Sandie Shaw

'Think sometimes about me' was released in November 1966, just months before the singer would become a Eurovision icon with 'Puppet on a string'. This single would end up on the album named after that Eurovision hit.

What's interesting (for me anyway) is not so much the A side of this single, but the B side: 'Hide all emotion' was written by Marty Wilde. Hence, I had to have this single.

My collection: 7" single no. 5816
Found: Record fair, Utrecht, December 19, 2015
Cost: 2 pounds
Tracks: 'Think sometimes about me' / 'Hide all emotion'

Listen to the song

La la la - Heidi Brühl

Heidi Rosemarie Brühl was born on January 30, 1942. She was a German singer and actress who came to prominence as a young teenager and had a prolific career in film and television. She was also a successful recording artist, and is known for her participation in the 1963 Eurovision Song Contest for Germany with the song 'Marcel'.

In 1968, she recorded this cover version of Spain's winning song 'La la la' - in German. She died of breast cancer on June 8, 1991, aged just 49.

My collection: 7" single no. 5813
Found: Record fair, Utrecht, November 21, 2015
Cost: 0,8 euro
Tracks: 'La la la' / 'Und mein Zug fährt immer weiter...'

Listen to the song
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